Bumbershoot – The Plays of Jeffrey James Ircink

for 20-page samples of my original plays, click on "read the rest of this entry"

“the Golgotha crux.”

What if a letter existed that cast doubt on the true identity of Jesus Christ? And what if the source of that letter was St. Paul, who, more than anyone, was responsible for spreading and establishing Christianity throughout the world? And what if the Vatican knew about this letter but kept the revelation secret?

Golgotha title art

Stephen Prosser is a devout Catholic and deacon, respected family therapist, and loving husband and father who has been struggling with aspects of his faith. Stephen confronts his mentor, Father Benjamin Vox, when he discovers that Father Benjamin and the Catholic Church are involved in a cover-up that, if made public, could confirm that Jesus was not the Son of God.  Stephen wrestles with the moral and ethical questions raised by the cover-up. With the church seemingly confirming some of Stephen’s religious doubts with the discovery of this letter, should Stephen feel justified – confident in his questioning of Christianity? Or will this revelation somehow provide Stephen with the strength to reaffirm his faith in God? And, will Stephen tell the press what he knows? Full-length, drama (6M, 4W, 1 VO doublecast)

*  Premiere stage reading at the Urban Theater Project of Iowa in May 2004.

*  Finalist in the Dayton Playhouse Futurefest 2004.

*  Semi-finalist in the Wagner College 2004 Stanley Drama Award competition in New York.

*  Honorable Mention in the 73rd Annual Writer’s Digest Writing Competition/2004.

the Golgotha crux.
a play in two acts
by jeffrey james ircink

© Copyright 2003, Jeffrey James Ircink

LC: Pau-2-758-362

6405 blossom ct.
greendale, wi 53129
c: (262) 806-2808
jeffbumbershoot43@gmail.com

January 2005

SETTING
Any town in the United States.

TIME
The present.

Character breakdown

STEPHEN PROSSER – 43, family therapist and church deacon, devout Catholic, an “Everyman”; hasn’t really gotten over the death of his daughter, Shelby – he “talks” to her; he has a dry sense of humor and a positive outlook on life; moderate

FATHER BENJAMIN VOX – 74, head pastor at St. Dominic’s Church, friendly, warm, intelligent, kindly – like your grandfather – but deceptively pious when it comes to being a priest; conservative

VANESSA PROSSER – 43, Stephen’s wife, has a MBA, but has taken time off to raise their child; a once practicing Catholic, she has shunned organized religion, largely because of the death of her daughter; attractive, independent, blunt – but emotional and caring, liberal

SHELBY PROSSER – 6, she died two years prior and appears only as a figment of Stephen’s imagination, as cute as a button – and knows it, intelligent beyond her years, takes after her mother

CHRISTOPHER PROSSER – 7, your average boy, inquisitive, remembers some things about his sister, but doesn’t talk about her much

ALEC WINSTON – 20, college student, has been a patient of Stephen’s for a year or so; very intelligent, reserved, not a big sense of humor, but can be funny and playful in a sarcastic way

RICHARD YOUST – 45, comical, verbose
JUDY YOUST – 48, loud, opinionated
ROBERT WESTON – 52, stoic, intelligent, dry
EVELYN WESTON – 45, quiet, reserved
(NOTE: Double-cast the following character from the four characters above.)
ROSE – Stephen’s secretary (V.O.)

act I

scene i Sunday morning. St. Dominic’s Church.
scene ii Early Sunday morning. One week later. Prosser home.
scene iii Monday morning. Stephen Prosser’s office.
scene iv Wednesday morning. Father Benjamin’s office.
scene v Monday evening. Prosser home.
scene vi Tuesday morning. One week later. Stephen Prosser’s office.
scene vii Early Wednesday evening. Father Benjamin’s office.
scene viii Wednesday evening. Later that evening. Prosser home.
scene ix Friday. Stephen’s office.
scene x Saturday evening. Prosser home.
scene xi Saturday evening. One week later. Father Benjamin’s office.

act II
scene i Later that same Saturday evening. Prosser home.
scene i i Monday evening. Prosser home.
scene iii Saturday. Early morning. Prosser home.
scene iv Saturday. Late afternoon. St. Dominic’s Church.
scene v Saturday. Early evening. Prosser home.
scene vi Saturday. Late evening. Prosser home.
scene vii Saturday. Later that same evening. Prosser home.
scene viii Monday. Late morning. Stephen’s office.
scene ix Monday evening. Prosser home. Prosser home.
scene x Wednesday. Late morning. St. Dominic’s.
scene xi Friday. Early evening. Prosser home.

ACT I, SCENE I

(Sunday morning. St. Dominic’s Church. Spotlight POPS on an empty pulpit. Head pastor, Father Benjamin Vox, 74, enters from stage right and delivers his sermon.)

FATHER BEN

When Jesus came into the district of Caesari a Phillippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do men say the Son of God is?” And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Eli jah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?” Simon Peter replied, “You are the Christ, the Son of the Living God.” And Jesus answered him, “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jona! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church,

(Begin a SLOW FADE UP on Stephen Prosser’s bedroom.)

and the powers of death will not prevail against it.”

(Father Ben exits. FADE TO BLACK.)

ACT I, SCENE II

(Early Sunday morning. One week later. Prosser home. Stephen Prosser, 43, is lying in bed. He is talking to his daughter, Shelby, 6. Shelby passed away two years earlier and is a figment of Stephen’s imagination. She is dressed in the same Sunday church outfit the entire play – a white dress and black buckle shoes.)

SHELBY

Daddy?

(Stephen doesn’t move. She shakes him.)

Daddy?

STEPHEN

I’m sleeping, baby.

SHELBY

(Placing her shoes and socks on the bed.)

I need help buckling my shoes.

STEPHEN

(Stephen opens one eye and glances at the clock on the nightstand.)

Shelby, why are you up and dressed at six in the morning?

SHELBY

Because it’s your first day at being a deacon.

STEPHEN

That’s not for a few hours yet, OK? Go back to bed.

SHELBY

But I don’t want you to be late.

STEPHEN

(Shelby tugs on the covers and Stephen reluctantly gets up.)

Remind me again, Shelby, that it’s the weekend.

SHELBY

It’s the weekend, Daddy.

STEPHEN

Thanks.

(Noticing Vanessa’s not in bed.)

Where’s your mother?

SHELBY

I dunno.

STEPHEN

(Lifting her onto the bed.)

Alright…let me see what you’ve got there.

SHELBY

My socks, first.

STEPHEN

Socks first. Right.

SHELBY

Daddy are you going to pray for me in church today?

STEPHEN

I pray for you everyday, baby. How about me? Daddy’s need prayers said for them, too, you know.

SHELBY

I know. I always pray for you, Daddy.

VANESSA

(Off-stage. Vanessa Prosser, 43, yells from downstairs.)

Stephen?!

STEPHEN

(To Vanessa.)

Vanessa!?

VANESSA

Are you up!?

 

STEPHEN

(To Vanessa.)

I am now!

(To Shelby.)

Aren’t I, baby?

VANESSA

You had a phone call this morning!

 

STEPHEN

(Pause.)

Am I the only person who wants to sleep in this morning?

SHELBY

I don’t know.

STEPHEN

I was talking to myself, baby. It’s called a rhetor – forget it.

(To Vanessa.)

Who was it?!

VANESSA

Benjamin!

STEPHEN

Benjamin who?!

VANESSA

Benjamin from St. Dominic’s! How many Benjamin’s do you know?!

STEPHEN

(To Shelby.)

I know two.

(To Vanessa.)

What did he want?!

VANESSA

He wanted to wish you luck this morning! You know, if you’d get outta bed and come down here we wouldn’t have to shout like this!

STEPHEN

(To Shelby.)

Really?

(To Vanessa.)

OK!

VANESSA

What!

STEPHEN

(Ignoring Vanessa.)

Where were we?

(Finishes with one shoe.)

How does that feel?

(Shelby doesn’t answer.)

You can answer that question.

SHELBY

It feels good.

 

(Pause.)

I like going to church, Daddy.

STEPHEN

(Putting on Shelby’s other shoe.)

I know you do, baby.

SHELBY

‘Cause Father Ben always picks me up and calls me his “little princess”. And I get to wear my white dress.

 

STEPHEN

Shelby, I see you in your white dress all the time.

(Pause.)

You know Father Ben’s away on a trip this week, so you won’t see him today.

SHELBY

I know.

(Pause.)

Do you think Mommy will come to church with us today?

STEPHEN

Shelby, you ask me that every Sunday, and every Sunday I tell you…

SHELBY

You tell me ‘Mommy’s busy. Maybe next Sunday’.

STEPHEN

Then why do you keep asking me?

SHELBY

If I keep asking, maybe she’ll come with us one day. Doesn’t she want to see what you do as a deacon?

STEPHEN

There’ll be plenty of chances for Mommy to see Daddy as a deacon.

(Giving her the once-over.)

You know, Father Benjamin’s right – you do look like a princess.

SHELBY

I know, Daddy.

(Shelby gives Stephen a hug and kiss, then exits. Stephen collapses back into bed. To suggest the passing of time – QUICK BLACKOUT and FADE UP lights on Christopher, 7, and Vanessa, who are finishing breakfast.)

STEPHEN

(Enters. Sarcastically.)

What a great morning not to sleep in.

CHRISTOPHER

Hi, Dad. Wanna hear about my dream?

STEPHEN

(Kisses Vanessa.)

So were you up at the crack of dawn, too?

VANESSA

(Motioning to Christopher.)

Morning. I didn’t have a choice.

(She brings Stephen’s coffee and breakfast to the table.)

Breakfast is hot.

STEPHEN

(He sits.)

Thanks.

VANESSA

He’s been talking about his dream since he got up. I think

 

you’ll get a kick out of it.

STEPHEN

So, sport…lay it on me.

CHRISTOPHER

I had a dream last night.

STEPHEN

I got that. What was it about?

CHRISTOPHER

I dreamt about Jesus.

STEPHEN

OK.

(To Vanessa.)

Doesn’t sound so frightening.

(To Christopher.)

And what was Jesus up to in your dream?

CHRISTOPHER

He wasn’t up to anything ‘cause he was nailed to the cross.

STEPHEN

(Pause.)

That’s an interesting image on a Sunday morning. You won’t be mad if I don’t press you for more details, will ya, sport?

CHRISTOPHER

Nope.

STEPHEN

You know…

CHRISTOPHER

Except that Jesus was laughing while he was on the cross – I forgot that part. Did you ever have a dream like that, Dad?

STEPHEN

No, I haven’t, Christopher, and I don’t think Jesus laughed when he was on the cross. Pass the jelly would you, Vanessa.

VANESSA

(She passes the jelly, glances at the clock, then grabs Stephen’s breakfast plate.)

You’re gonna be late.

STEPHEN

(Grabbing a slice of toast as Vanessa pulls the plate away.)

 

I just sat down.

(Christopher gets up and starts for the door.)

Hey, wait a second, sport! Come here.

(Christopher stops and walks back toward Stephen. With a dab of spit, Stephen presses down the hair that’s sticking up on Christopher’s head.)

STEPHEN

Let’s not have you go off to church looking like you just got out of bed, OK?

(Christopher nods.)

OK.

(Looking at Vanessa.)

What?

(Vanessa smiles as Christopher runs off. and hands Stephen a donut wrapped in a napkin and a “to-go” mug.)

CHRISTOPHER

(Off-stage.)

Come on, Dad!

STEPHEN

I’m coming!

VANESSA

You’ve got quite the sidekick there.

STEPHEN

Well, you know. Train’em when they’re young and they won’t know any different.

VANESSA

I think he’s as anxious as you are.

STEPHEN

Who said I was nervous?

VANESSA

I didn’t say you were nervous. I said you were anxious.

STEPHEN

(Puts his hand out.)

Look at that…cool as a cucumber.

(Stephen begins to exit, then hesitates.)

Last chance to come watch me set Catholicism back a hundred years.

VANESSA

I’m sure the church can figure out how to do that all by its lonesome.

STEPHEN

Yeh.

(Stephen exits. Vanessa walks to the sink. While her back is turned, Shelby runs past and out the door.)

SHELBY

Wait for me, Daddy!!

(Vanessa doesn’t notice Shelby. FADE TO BLACK.)

ACT I, SCENE III

(Monday morning. Stephen’s office. Stephen is talking to Alec Winston, 20, a college student and patient.)

ALEC

You seem preoccupied this morning, Dr. Prosser.

STEPHEN

I have a meeting with my board of review. I’m – anxious.

(Pause.)

So, Alec. What would you like to talk about today?

ALEC

Haven’t given it much thought. We could talk about the weekend?

STEPHEN

How was your weekend?

ALEC

Uneventful really. Studied mostly.

STEPHEN

OK.

ALEC

(Long pause.)

My car got towed last week.

(Stephen’s quiet.)

No parking zone.

STEPHEN

Shoulda read the signs.

ALEC

There weren’t any posted.

(Thinking.)

Huh. I can’t think of anything else that would constitute as a “highlight”, doctor.

STEPHEN

Everyone has a “highlight”, Alec. A proctologist has a highlight. You have a highlight.

ALEC

I’m alive?

STEPHEN

(Pause.)

See, you’re in the black already.

ALEC

(Pause.)

You know what, that’s OK. I’m starting to get used to the bad-things-happen-to-good-people routine.

STEPHEN

Need the name of a good guardian angel?

ALEC

You mean there are bad ones? I don’t think it would do me any good anyway.

STEPHEN

Got something against guardian angels?

ALEC

Just religion.

STEPHEN

(Pause.)

I see.

ALEC

Sort of a handy little thing to help tie up loose ends, isn’t it?

STEPHEN

Religion? Depends on what kind of loose ends you have in your life, Alec.

ALEC

None that concern religion. Besides, being an atheist sorta has a ring to it, don’t you think?

STEPHEN

How do your parents feel about this?

ALEC

Helpless, I suppose. We don’t discuss it much. I’m an adult. What can they do?

STEPHEN

Well, since we seem to be at a standstill as to what to talk about, why don’t we talk about your lack of a faith?

ALEC

I didn’t know religion figured into your repertoire of counseling techniques.

STEPHEN

I guess I’m partial to the unconventional – as long as it works.

(Pause.)

Being an atheist is part of who you are, Alec. If discussing that aspect of your life helps our sessions, who’s the wiser?

ALEC

Wait a second.

(Pause.)

I’m hearing a faint chorus of “Shall We Gather at the River”.

STEPHEN

(Smiling.)

My job is to get people to talk about what’s troubling them, and it doesn’t sound like you’re troubled about your religious beliefs. But the choice you made – that’s a journey I’m interested in.

ALEC

Whatdaya wanna know?

 

STEPHEN

“Why” seems like a great place to start.

ALEC

Why not?

(FADE TO BLACK.)

ACT I, SCENE IV

(Wednesday morning. Father Benjamin’s office. Stephen knocks on the door, then pokes his head in.)

FATHER BEN

Good morning, Stephen. This is a surprise.

STEPHEN

Morning, Father. I was in the neighborhood. Um-m…actually I thought we could talk, but I can come back if you’re busy.

FATHER BEN

Nonsense. Have a seat.

(Stephen enters and sits. Father Ben shuts the door and returns to his desk.)

STEPHEN

So how was your trip? Rome, wasn’t it?

FATHER BEN

Oh-h, it was wonderful. Have you ever been?

STEPHEN

No.

FATHER BEN

Do you know that after all these years of going to the Vatican, I finally tossed a coin into Trevi Fountain?

STEPHEN

You made a wish, right?

FATHER BEN

I did. And I’m still waiting for it to come true. So. What can I do for you, Stephen?

STEPHEN

(He fumbles for the right words, yet the words he chooses are spoken slowly and deliberately.)

Father…do you ever – have you ever questioned…I mean, really questioned your faith?

FATHER BEN

I question God every day, Stephen. Even the most pious and zealous Christians question their faith.

STEPHEN

And that doesn’t bother you?

FATHER BEN

Not really. When you spend as much time as I do engrossed in the scripture, religious history and doctrine – the business of religion – one is bound to find discrepancies in philosophy and teachings that lead you to ask “why?”.

(Pause.)

I might be able to answer your question better if I knew what it is you’re questioning.

STEPHEN

I’m not exactly sure.

(Pause.)

I guess I don’t feel like I trust God the way I used to – you know, that I’m expected to blindly put my faith in him ‘cause he’s got all the answers. Look at the world, Father – people are starving and killing each other…there’s suffering, disease, children – not even being given a chance to experience life.

(Pause.)

Have you ever thought – what if religion is some fantasy that the church perpetuates to keep us in check? The whole concept of Christianity isn’t rational thought, Father – you do understand that? I mean if I were to wake up tomorrow and tell the world I communicate with God through my electric shaver, people would think I was nuts. But to believe in one, supreme being whose son was born of a virgin birth, turned water into wine, raised dead people, ascended into heaven – that’s perfectly acceptable behavior. And if you don’t believe that, then you’re nuts.

FATHER BEN

(Thinking.)

That’s a lot for one man to have on his plate.

STEPHEN

I have a voracious appetite.

 

FATHER BEN

I see that. You know, Stephen, questioning God’s motives is vastly different than questioning his existence.

STEPHEN

I believe God exists.

FATHER

There – we’ve put one question to rest.

(Pause.)

Have you felt this way before? To the extent that it’s bothering you this much?

STEPHEN

(Pause.)

No.

 

 

(Pause.)

When my father died – I was 26, and…that was a rough time for me. He’d been sick for a while, so we knew, you know, that it wouldn’t be too long…but you’re never really prepared…ah-h, to deal with him…dying. I went to see him in the hospital – toward the end, and I was looking at him and boom – my entire life spent with my father flashed in front of my eyes. Hunting and fishing, dad playing his guitar, working in the yard – my parents together. We talked for a bit and at one point he came right out and said, ‘Stephen, I need to know that you’re OK with me letting go. I’m ready to be with Grandma and Grandpa. I’m ready to be with God.’ I didn’t know what to say. I stood there – my eyes welled up, and suddenly I blurted out, ‘You’re gonna fight this – you can beat this if you’d only try! Please, Dad. Please, try!’ He said, ‘I can’t, Stephen. I’m tired. It’s my time’, and I yelled, ‘I don’t care! I can’t let you go, not like this! Look at all the things we haven’t done! Do you hear me?! Please hang on, Dad! Please!’ I hugged him so hard – I was afraid to let go. I gave him a kiss on his cheek and whispered into his ear, ‘I can’t let you go, Dad…not like this’. I was crying and I ran out. He died an hour later.

(Pause.)

I know I’m not the only person to lose a loved one, but I didn’t care about other people’s pain – only my own. There was never any conflict between my dad and I – nothing left unsaid. I just loved him so much and didn’t want him to leave me. And when he did, I hated life and I hated God for taking him away from me.

 

FATHER BEN

But you returned to your faith.

STEPHEN

It took a while, but yeh.

FATHER BEN

And things at home are…

STEPHEN

Fine.

FATHER BEN

I know you don’t like to talk about it, but Vanessa’s faith – it’s been shaken terribly. Could that have some bearing on this uncertainty your feeling?

STEPHEN

Shaken? Father, she has no faith.

FATHER BEN

You’ve managed to weather that crisis rather well…considering.

STEPHEN

It’s…a – I’m still weathering it.

FATHER

How are things at work? Dealing with people’s unpleasantries day after day…maybe that has something to do with the way you’re feeling.

STEPHEN

My job.

(Pause.)

Lots of lost souls whose therapist’s tolerance and understanding isn’t what it used to be.

FATHER BEN

You sound disenchanted.

STEPHEN

I don’t enjoy my work like I used to. I used to enjoy listening to perfect strangers’ problems and offering my analysis. Now I – it feels like I’m going through the motions.

(Stephen snickers to himself.)

FATHER BEN

What’s that?

STEPHEN

Oh, I was just thinking that the highlight of my job is when I see this kid – a patient of mine. We stumbled on the topic of religion during one of our sessions and he informed me that he’s an atheist. I saw that revelation as some psychological nugget – whatever, and pursued it and whenever we talk about religion, regardless of what Christian spin I try to put on what he says, his logic makes more sense than anything I’ve ever believed.

(Pause.)

I try to pray –

(Pause.) – but I don’t understand why I’m praying. I mean even when I dream about religion – I don’t see things the way I used to, the way I’m supposed to. And it’s the same dream, over and over and over again.

FATHER BEN

Well now you’ve piqued my interest.

STEPHEN

In my dream?

FATHER BEN

I’d like to hear about it. If you don’t mind.

STEPHEN

(Hesitant.)

Well…

(Then reflecting – taking his time.) …um-m, the dream is about the crucifixion. I’m standing outside, with all these people at Calvary, Golgotha, however you wanna refer to the place where Jesus was crucified. It’s pouring. The puddles have puddles. It’s dark out…you can’t tell where the sky ends and the earth begins. The people standing around me, sobbing in the mud…they’re just silhouettes. I can’t make out anyone’s face. No one’s talking. And I’m waiting for this big…ta-da, you know? I’m waiting for Jesus to reveal himself while he’s nailed on the cross – something poignant ‘cause…that’s what he does, right? So I wait. There’s nothing. I wait a little longer. Quiet. Just the rain and sobbing. And I’m like, ‘come on, Son of God…the spotlight’s on you’, and then…he starts laughing, and this sadness I’m overcome with turns to – well, I’m not sure; all I know is I’m feeling creepy all of a sudden. And then Jesus says, ‘Why are you people wasting your time in the rain mourning me? I’m not the Son of God! Go! I can’t save you or myself! You are all going to die, just like me!’. The rain stops. The sobbing stops. And Jesus dies. There’s no angels blaring trumpets or heavenly hosts. The ground doesn’t shake. There’s no ascension into heaven. This man is dead – forever.

 

(Pause.)

Not a popular version for Sunday morning sermons is it, Father?

FATHER BEN

No. No it’s not. What do you think it means?

 

STEPHEN

(Thinking.)

I really don’t think I wanna know. What I do know is that Christopher’s had the same dream and any psychologist will tell you that that’s…unusual.

FATHER BEN

Huh.

 

(Thinking.)

Well for starters, I’d suggest doing something to stimulate the religious aspect of your life – take a retreat, read scripture, pray.

(Pause.)

Now this patient of yours – is he an atheist lauding atheism, or an atheist with some void in his life searching for direction? More and more people are turning back to religion these days. He may feel uncomfortable discussing this with his parents and he’s looking to you for spiritual counseling.

STEPHEN

I’ve considered that.

 

FATHER BEN

Have faith, Stephen. The answers will come to you – along with God’s comfort and blessings. You know, the way in which you help this patient of yours may, in turn, be the same thing that helps you.

STEPHEN

Maybe.

(Looking at his watch.)

I, ah – I should go, Father. Thanks…for listening.

FATHER BEN

That’s what we do, isn’t it?

STEPHEN

Yes we do. Goodbye.

(Stephen exits. FADE TO BLACK.)

ACT I, SCENE V

(Monday evening. Prosser home. The Prosser’s have just sat down to dinner. Shelby’s back is facing the audience.)

STEPHEN

Shall we say “Grace”?

VANESSA

(Looking around.)

I forgot the peas.

(She heads into the kitchen.)

ALL

“Bless us, oh Lord, and these our gifts, for which we are about to receive, from thy bounty through Christ our Lord. Amen.”

STEPHEN

So how was your day, Christopher?

VANESSA

(Re-enters with peas.)

Tell your father what happened at school.

CHRISTOPHER

Tommy Shuck farted during naptime.

 

VANESSA

I meant tell your father what you did in school today.

CHRISTOPHER

Oh. Um-m…first, we checked our homework from yesterday. I got three stars. Then we finger-painted leaves falling off the trees. Mrs. Weirs read us a story, and, let’s see…we ate lunch, took our nap, and that’s when Tommy Shuck farted.

VANESSA

Christopher.

CHRISTOPHER

I don’t think he knew he farted though ‘cause he was asleep.

STEPHEN

So, did someone tell Tommy he –

VANESSA

Now that we’ve covered the day’s important events – Stephen, anything exciting happen at the office today?

STEPHEN

Nothing out of the ordinary, though I did have an interesting discussion with a patient – a college student – I’ve been counseling for a year or so.

(Glancing at Vanessa.)

He informed me out of the blue that he doesn’t have a faith either.

VANESSA

Yeh…there are a few of “those” people around. You didn’t give the poor kid the third degree, did you?

STEPHEN

No-o, I didn’t give the poor kid the third degree. We talked about it though. That’s what his parent’s are paying me for.

VANESSA

To talk about why their child’s an atheist?

STEPHEN

I don’t pick the topics of conversation, Vanessa. I just listen.

CHRISTOPHER

What does “atheist” mean?

STEPHEN

(Quick look to Vanessa.)

Ah-h…well, an atheist is a person who doesn’t believe in God.

CHRISTOPHER

Like the devil?

STEPHEN

Not quite. The devil believes in God – he just doesn’t like God’s work. The devil used to be one of God’s angels, did you know that?

VANESSA

Stephen…

STEPHEN

Yeh, he was. So…

CHRISTOPHER

How does an angel become a devil?

VANESSA

Christopher, eat your food, please.

STEPHEN

Hm-m. That’s a tough one, sport. Um. If you’re an angel, and you disobey God…then he sends you to a place where all the bad people go. It’s not common for one of God’s angels to act naughty though.

CHRISTOPHER

Could I ever become a devil?

STEPHEN

You already are, sport.

CHRISTOPHER

Did you try on your Halloween costume yet?

STEPHEN

(Not happy.)

I will, don’t worry.

Advertisements

No comments yet»

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: